Washington state builds bridge to keep wildlife off highway. Can we do it here in NM?

SNOQUALMIE PASS, Wash. (AP) — Before descending the Cascade Mountains on its final stretch to Seattle, Interstate 90 cuts through a mountain pass of old growth forests and wetlands. For countless wildlife species, the busy highway is a border, constraining their movements and posing a fatal risk should they dare to cross it. “Everything from an elk down to a small salamander, they need to move to find food, to find mates, to find new places to live as their populations expand or just when conditions change, like a fire breaks out,” said Jen Watkins of Conservation Northwest.

Source: Washington state builds bridge to keep wildlife off highway

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Cascade Crossroads Documentary Film — Ted Grudowski

Video portfolio for award-winning video storyteller Ted Grudowski

See this beautiful documentary here:  Cascade Crossroads Documentary Film — Ted Grudowski

The I-90 freeway corridor runs east/west across the state of Washington, cutting the Cascade Mts. in half, imposing a barrier to the north/south flow of animals like bears, elk and cougars, but also to the endangered wolverine, timber wolf, and rare fish like the freshwater cod and bull trout.
A plan to widen the freeway was seen as an opportunity to create wildlife friendly passage under and over the freeway for a 40 mile wide swath in the Snowqualamie Pass area. Sound familiar? This is how the wildlife friendly crossing structures were able to be added to I-40 in New Mexico, when the freeway was being widened and upgraded back in 2007.

Petition · Freeport-McMoRan: Protect the Gila River in New Mexico from a harmful new agricultural diversion · Change.org

Freeport-McMoRan: Protect the Gila River in New Mexico from a harmful new agricultural diversion. You have the power, use it for good! Protect the Gila river and use water for agriculture. Yes, we can do both, so please choose that option.  See petition for details:

Source: Petition · Freeport-McMoRan: Protect the Gila River in New Mexico from a harmful new agricultural diversion · Change.org

Born to Rewild: The Perfect Emotional Sendoff to 23rd Sedona Film Festival – Wildlands Network

This piece in Verde Independent highlights the emotional undertone of Born to Rewild, which, while telling the story of John Davis’ 5,000-mile trek from Mexico to Canada, serves as a tribute to filmmaker Ed George’s love of the wild. Photo: Kristen M. Caldon

Source: Born to Rewild: The Perfect Emotional Sendoff to 23rd Sedona Film Festival – Wildlands Network

Pathways: Wildlife Corridors of NM | WON

“Pathways: Wildlife Corridors of NM” has created a new project on the “Wildlife Observers Network” (WON), a site for camera trap management sponsored by the Road Ecology Center of UC Davis in CA.

Visit our project here:   Pathways: Wildlife Corridors of NM | WON

and see some of photos and video from our wildlife monitoring efforts of the past 5 years on the north end of Sandia Mt.  We looking at wildlife connectivity across the transitional zone between the mountain ranges of Sandia, Sangre de Cristo and Jemez in central NM.  See map above.

From our last NM Wildways meeting on Jan. 31st, 2017, we realized the Tijeras Cyn. wildlife crossings under I-40 really needed our focus.  The project there needs to be upgraded and maintained with a long-term commitment from NM D.O.T.  This project is already in place and could be a positive focal point to highlight wildlife connectivity needs throughout the state.

See you all at wildlife day at the Roundhouse in Santa Fe in two days!

America’s Wildlife Corridors Are Sexy, Very Sexy

Most of them are still a mystery to science, and the ones we know about have big problems.

Since researchers found it, the Red Desert to Hoback mule deer corridor has made the study of land migration suddenly sexy—“very sexy,” Steve Kilpatrick, a field scientist working with the Wyoming Wildlife Federation, told me.

See the full article in The Atlantic here:

Source: America’s Wildlife Corridors Are in Danger – The Atlantic

New Mexico has its problems as well of course, but we have started to address them with the Tijeras Cyn. underpasses on I-40 east of ABQ.  Those systems need to be maintained and upgraded however, so a call to the NM Dept. of Transportation, your auto insurance carrier, and our politicians will help put the Tijeras Cyn. “Safe Passages” project back on the map.  See their website here: Tijeras Canyon Safe Passage Coalition